WHO KILLED THE INTERNET PROTECTION BILL IN 2000?

DC - Abramoff admitted to giving the wife of an unnamed congressional staffer $50,000 in return for help in voting down an Internet gambling bill.
Democracy down drain when money is motivator/www.webujournal.com/1.26.06

The unfolding story of the Abramoff scandal involves a tawdry tale of how lobbying against the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act was dressed up, falsely, by the opposition as an effort to stop Internet gambling. Internet Poker Shouldn't Be Legalized/www.humaneventsonline.com/4.17.06

Another name that has become popular for all the wrong reasons is Jack Abramoff, a businessman and lobbyist. He recently pleaded guilty to fraud, tax evasion and conspiracy to bribe public officials. Abramoff admitted to giving the wife of an unnamed congressional staffer $50,000 in return for help in voting down an Internet gambling bill.
Democracy down drain when money is motivator/www.webujournal.com - Opinion/1.26.06

Abramoff also arranged for eLottery to pay $25,000 to a Jewish foundation that hired Rudy's wife as a consultant, according to documents and interviews. Months later, Rudy (DeLay aide) himself was hired as a lobbyist by Abramoff. Abramoff is under indictment in another case in connection with an allegedly fraudulent Florida business deal. Abramoff quietly arranged for eLottery to pay conservative, anti-gambling activists to help in the firm's $2 million pro-gambling campaign, including Ralph Reed, former head of the Christian Coalition, and the Rev. Louis P. Sheldon of the Traditional Values Coalition. Both kept in close contact with Abramoff about the arrangement, e-mails show. Abramoff also turned to prominent anti-tax conservative Grover Norquist, arranging to route some of eLottery's money for Reed through Norquist's group, Americans for Tax Reform. At one point, eLottery's backers even circulated a forged letter of support from Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R). DeLay, an outspoken opponent of gambling, was an instrument, witting or unwitting, in eLottery's campaign, documents and interviews show. Along with Rudy, he was a guest on a golfing trip to Scotland. As majority whip, he cast a rare vote against his party on the Internet gambling bill and for the rest of the year helped keep the measure off the floor. Abramoff also arranged for eLottery to pay $25,000 to a Jewish foundation that hired Rudy's wife as a consultant, according to documents and interviews. Months later, Rudy himself was hired as a lobbyist by Abramoff. Abramoff is under indictment in another case in connection with an allegedly fraudulent Florida business deal. Documents show that Abramoff's strategy was to dispatch Sheldon to pressure about 10 social conservatives in their home districts, accusing them of being soft on gambling for supporting Goodlatte's bill. Weeks later, a political mailer from Sheldon's group landed like a small bomb in the North Alabama district of Rep. Robert Aderholt. The Republican was a member of the religious right's Values Action Team in Congress, a champion of public displays of the Ten Commandments and a vigorous gambling opponent. But now, in the midst of a tough reelection race, Aderholt was accused of being soft on gambling. Sheldon's fliers also targeted Rep. J.C. Watts of Oklahoma, then the House GOP deputy whip, and vulnerable incumbents, including Rep. James E. Rogan of California, one of the managers of the impeachment of President Bill Clinton, and Rep. Robin Hayes of North Carolina. Sheldon said in an interview this week that he recalled little about his efforts against the bill in 2000. He said he did not remember receiving a $25,000 check from eLottery, but added that it is possible that his organization did receive it. He said he remembered some money coming in to pay for fliers he had printed and mailed to congressional districts to persuade members to oppose the bill.
How a Lobbyist Stacked the Deck/Washington Post/By Susan Schmidt and James V. Grimaldi/10.16.05