EXCERPTS FROM "ROCK SOUP"

By Nat Helms, former spokesperson for
"Vote Yes Amendment 6 Committee"
(The casino group responsible for spending over $12 Million
to legalize gambling in Missouri)
Presented October 27, 1995, in Orlando, Florida at the annual NCALG meeting


Mark and Pat had founded it and were the chief spokesmen for the Citizens for Life and Liberty, which is an organization opposed to gambling...

And to their credit they did an admirable job but when you have 12 million dollars looking at you and a statewide organization that hires the best political organizers, the best pollsters in the country and, with no illwill intended, [they] didn't have a chance.

And within the mechanisms of the taxing structure of this Amendment Six - as it was hammered out - we made sure that public safety, the police chiefs, the fire chiefs, ambulance, districts got money. So we make sure that we got the police chiefs on our side. And that was one of my jobs. I was a policeman for seven years and so they used me as sort of the guy to go around and talk to the police. The farther away you got from the boat, the farther a stretch it was to convince them that they were going to benefit from these boats. But a few golfing tournaments and we had them sowed up.

So we decided the best way to get the media's attention was to attack Mark and Pat. Well, there's nothing fair about the gambling industry. And so the first thing we did to Mark was we decided we were going to hook him up with the Nazis down in Louisiana, which was a pretty far stretch. And it embarrasses me to this day what happened next. We had an internal memo that was generated by the campaign leaders that was going to dictate how we were going to associate Mark and his campaign with the Nazis. Once we did that we were going to leak it to the media with all these vague allegations. ...we knew that you put Nazis and Christians in the same sentence and you're going to get some reaction. And so that's exactly what we did. The problem was, when we slipped this information to the TV station that was going to cooperate with us, we forgot to take out this inter-office memo. So we have our guy, he was a lawyer, a friend of mine, a guy named Bob Ramsey. He's up on television talking to this reporter saying just how astounded he was to discover that Mark Andrews was somehow associated with Nazis.

....the real method for promoting gambling had nothing to do with public perception, it had to do with money. Whenever we had a problem, when we made a mistake, no problem. Out would come the checkbook. I'll give you an example of that. In Kansas City, we had a bunch of black ministers associated with an organization over there called Freedom, Inc., which is a predominately Democratic, north side, black organization to promote black political causes in Kansas City - ostensibly, at least with oversight, was run by the mayor over there - they were up on their pulpits preaching against gambling. Their message was that the black man, the black woman, is the person that can least afford gambling and is going to suffer the most from the loss. We went to them and said, "what is it going to take for you to change your message?" Nothing convinced them of anything. So we said, "what about a million dollars?" Well, that worked. Next week, gambling is good. Gambling is good for Kansas City. They got posters out, they got their ward workers out. We bought the ministers suits. Called them campaign jackets for the campaign report because you have to satisfy the federal and state rules on campaign reporting so I guess you could say a suit is a campaign jacket, depending on your point of view. We bought them I think it was $12,000 worth of campaign buttons. .......but not one of them ever appeared anywhere. We bought them baseball hats. Cost something like $5,000. You buy something, you create your CTR cash transfer report. You satisfy the state rules and the money goes to who you want it to go to.

The next thing we did was you also had to reach the predominately white political organizations. One example was that we had an organization that wanted to support us, we paid them $15,000 for six tables, three typewriters and two telephones. Now what they did with all that stuff, I don't know, but we paid them for it. They supported us. We made sure that we took care of the hotel owners. Had a lot of meetings in hotels, spent a lot of money for dinners. We wined and dined folks, we junketed them. We took them on the boats. I think we would have sent them to the moon if it would have worked out. But ultimately we got their votes also.

I had a particular Democratic Congressman that we really needed his support. We needed his support badly. He had come out against gambling in sort of a non specific way. Now that was high above my level of participation in what transpired next. But I do know that ultimately we gave him $50,000 to get out the vote. The press got wind of some of it and they got all excited. They found out we'd registered 14,000 votes. And boy they were all hopping up and down. They were out in front defending the campaign and so forth. What they didn't know is that we'd actually registered 54,000 voters. And that 54,000 voters that we registered not only promoted this Democratic cause, but it promoted us. We paid for it and it was a 54,000 vote margin that we won by. So that gives you an example of the kinds of power that the gambling industry has.

And in saying that, let me also say that prior to the campaign, we spread around about $4 million during the signature gathering process.....

I mean there were editorials all over the state of Missouri about how we must be doing something crooked to get 14,000 voters. We were just sweating bullets they were going to find out we had 54,000.

First thing, in order to satisfy the federal rules and state rules, you've got to have some kind of organization that you're paying to get these folks out to vote. So the first thing we did was set up our shell organization...the people we wanted to funnel money to. So we had two campaigns running, voter registration drives. They were to satisfy local politician's needs. And that was just following money, at least to my opinion. I mean I can't prove it. It didn't go to getting voters. And then we paid two legitimate voter registration activities that that's their professional life and we paid them handsomely and got them.

The mayor of Kansas City wasn't going to let anything happen without having his man in the campaign. Mayor of St. Louis wasn't going to let anything happen without his man in the campaign. .......but the guy in St. Louis, who was my direct boss, is and was a special assistant to the mayor of St. Louis. ...but his real job was keeping the mayor informed of what was going on.

EXCERPTS FROM "ROCK SOUP"

By Nat Helms, former spokesperson for
"Vote Yes Amendment 6 Committee"
(The casino group responsible for spending over $12 Million
to legalize gambling in Missouri)
Presented October 27, 1995, in Orlando, Florida at the annual NCALG meeting


Mark and Pat had founded it and were the chief spokesmen for the Citizens for Life and Liberty, which is an organization opposed to gambling...

And to their credit they did an admirable job but when you have 12 million dollars looking at you and a statewide organization that hires the best political organizers, the best pollsters in the country and, with no illwill intended, [they] didn't have a chance.

And within the mechanisms of the taxing structure of this Amendment Six - as it was hammered out - we made sure that public safety, the police chiefs, the fire chiefs, ambulance, districts got money. So we make sure that we got the police chiefs on our side. And that was one of my jobs. I was a policeman for seven years and so they used me as sort of the guy to go around and talk to the police. The farther away you got from the boat, the farther a stretch it was to convince them that they were going to benefit from these boats. But a few golfing tournaments and we had them sowed up.

So we decided the best way to get the media's attention was to attack Mark and Pat. Well, there's nothing fair about the gambling industry. And so the first thing we did to Mark was we decided we were going to hook him up with the Nazis down in Louisiana, which was a pretty far stretch. And it embarrasses me to this day what happened next. We had an internal memo that was generated by the campaign leaders that was going to dictate how we were going to associate Mark and his campaign with the Nazis. Once we did that we were going to leak it to the media with all these vague allegations. ...we knew that you put Nazis and Christians in the same sentence and you're going to get some reaction. And so that's exactly what we did. The problem was, when we slipped this information to the TV station that was going to cooperate with us, we forgot to take out this inter-office memo. So we have our guy, he was a lawyer, a friend of mine, a guy named Bob Ramsey. He's up on television talking to this reporter saying just how astounded he was to discover that Mark Andrews was somehow associated with Nazis.

....the real method for promoting gambling had nothing to do with public perception, it had to do with money. Whenever we had a problem, when we made a mistake, no problem. Out would come the checkbook. I'll give you an example of that. In Kansas City, we had a bunch of black ministers associated with an organization over there called Freedom, Inc., which is a predominately Democratic, north side, black organization to promote black political causes in Kansas City - ostensibly, at least with oversight, was run by the mayor over there - they were up on their pulpits preaching against gambling. Their message was that the black man, the black woman, is the person that can least afford gambling and is going to suffer the most from the loss. We went to them and said, "what is it going to take for you to change your message?" Nothing convinced them of anything. So we said, "what about a million dollars?" Well, that worked. Next week, gambling is good. Gambling is good for Kansas City. They got posters out, they got their ward workers out. We bought the ministers suits. Called them campaign jackets for the campaign report because you have to satisfy the federal and state rules on campaign reporting so I guess you could say a suit is a campaign jacket, depending on your point of view. We bought them I think it was $12,000 worth of campaign buttons. .......but not one of them ever appeared anywhere. We bought them baseball hats. Cost something like $5,000. You buy something, you create your CTR cash transfer report. You satisfy the state rules and the money goes to who you want it to go to.

The next thing we did was you also had to reach the predominately white political organizations. One example was that we had an organization that wanted to support us, we paid them $15,000 for six tables, three typewriters and two telephones. Now what they did with all that stuff, I don't know, but we paid them for it. They supported us. We made sure that we took care of the hotel owners. Had a lot of meetings in hotels, spent a lot of money for dinners. We wined and dined folks, we junketed them. We took them on the boats. I think we would have sent them to the moon if it would have worked out. But ultimately we got their votes also.

I had a particular Democratic Congressman that we really needed his support. We needed his support badly. He had come out against gambling in sort of a non specific way. Now that was high above my level of participation in what transpired next. But I do know that ultimately we gave him $50,000 to get out the vote. The press got wind of some of it and they got all excited. They found out we'd registered 14,000 votes. And boy they were all hopping up and down. They were out in front defending the campaign and so forth. What they didn't know is that we'd actually registered 54,000 voters. And that 54,000 voters that we registered not only promoted this Democratic cause, but it promoted us. We paid for it and it was a 54,000 vote margin that we won by. So that gives you an example of the kinds of power that the gambling industry has.

And in saying that, let me also say that prior to the campaign, we spread around about $4 million during the signature gathering process.....

I mean there were editorials all over the state of Missouri about how we must be doing something crooked to get 14,000 voters. We were just sweating bullets they were going to find out we had 54,000.

First thing, in order to satisfy the federal rules and state rules, you've got to have some kind of organization that you're paying to get these folks out to vote. So the first thing we did was set up our shell organization...the people we wanted to funnel money to. So we had two campaigns running, voter registration drives. They were to satisfy local politician's needs. And that was just following money, at least to my opinion. I mean I can't prove it. It didn't go to getting voters. And then we paid two legitimate voter registration activities that that's their professional life and we paid them handsomely and got them.

The mayor of Kansas City wasn't going to let anything happen without having his man in the campaign. Mayor of St. Louis wasn't going to let anything happen without his man in the campaign. .......but the guy in St. Louis, who was my direct boss, is and was a special assistant to the mayor of St. Louis. ...but his real job was keeping the mayor informed of what was going on.