WHAT IS GAMBLING DOING TO OUR CHILDREN?
4% ARE ADDICTED TO GAMBLING
4.17.06

"We have an epidemic."
Ed Looney, Council on Compulsive Gambling of N.J

"Today more young people gamble once a week
than smoke, drink or take drugs combined."

According to the Annenberg National Risk Survey of Youth, 4 percent to 6 percent of teens in the 12-to-17 age group are problem gamblers. Studies show that the average age that kids start playing poker is 11, and people who start playing younger report more addiction problems later on.
Teens can get hooked on gambling/www.charlotte.com/11.08.04

"I was invited to go to a school the day before Christmas vacation and I got there at 7 o'clock in the morning and they were wheeling a boy out in a body bag," he says. "He had hung himself the night before because he had lost on a bet.
The youthful lure of online poker/ nation.ittefaq.com/10.09.05

CBN.com – (CBN News) - More than one million teens are trapped in what is being called an invisible disease. It's gambling--one of the fastest-growing addictions among adolescents. In the end, Steve's trips (his senior year in high school) cost him $10,000 -- his entire savings. But dealing with his parents was even more painful. "My mom -- uncontrollable crying," he stated. "My dad--absolute disbelief. What they actually did was blame it on themselves."
Gambling: The 'Silent' Addiction among Teens/WDC Media News, Los Angeles/ 4.20.06

Teenagers and young adults are the fastest-growing segment of addicts.
Problem gamblers in spotlight/The Press-Enterprise/10.18.03

Gambling is the most popular high-risk activity among teenagers compared to alcohol, drugs and cigarette use. In fact, there is ample research demonstrating that 80% of teenagers gamble. Furthermore, between 4% and 6% of teenagers may be considered probable pathological gamblers with an additional 10% to 15% that may be considered at-risk of developing a gambling problem. A large scale study of adolescents in Alberta found that the average problem gambler started gambling at age 10. Similar results were found in several of our studies, as well as in other studies conducted throughout the world. Problematic gambling among adolescents has been linked with increased delinquency and criminal behaviour, as well as the disruption of family and peer relationships. The three predominant reasons adolescents report gambling (a) the excitement it brings, (b) enjoyment, and (c) to win money.
McGill University/www.youthgambling.com

Nearly four out of 10 teenagers gamble, according to an Addictions Foundation of Manitoba (AFM) report. The report shows 63 per cent of kids started gambling socially before their 10th birthday.
38 % of Grade 7-12 pupils gamble: study/www.brandonsun.com/10.15.05

A new survey by the National Council on Problem Gambling found 70 percent of 10- to 17-year-olds had gambled in the past year.
Kids Catch The Poker Bug/WCCO, MN/9.05.0p5

They probably don't know that the rate of problem gambling among teens is double that of adults -- 4 percent to 6 percent of youth have a severe gambling problem. Compare that with national statistics showing 4.2 percent of youth abuse alcohol and 2.3 percent have an illicit-drug problem. Isn't it ironic that some schools would promote gambling to decrease alcohol and drug use when the number-one addictive behavior on campus is gambling?
School Casino Night? Use It To Teach Gambling's Risks
By Jeff Marotta, Ph.D., is problem gambling services manager in the Oregon Department of Human Services/4.15.05


Reed, a local gambling addiction counselor, "more money is spent on gambling each year than on purchasing marijuana." Statistics show nearly 30 percent of adolescents who gamble began gambling with one or both parents. Teen-agers will often resort to stealing to support their habit. relationships can suffer, criminal behavior increases, delinquency surges, and work and school performance is impaired. Children who gamble are at an increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse. children begin gambling as early as 10 years of age. They include a sudden lowering of grades, changes in friends, changes in sleep patterns, moodiness, and an increase in time spent alone.
Gamble? Your kids also may take up the habit/Alexandria Daily Town Talk/ 4/24/00

An estimated 2.9 million U.S. teens gamble on cards every week.
Rising teen gambling worries experts /ConsumerHealthDaily/11.17.05

In Manitoba, a survey of 4,500 students by the province's addictions foundation...showed half of the students had gambled or placed a bet in the last year. Almost 700 of the teens had also played slot machines or video lottery terminals. A 1998 survey by Dalhousie University of 14,000 students in Atlantic Canada schools suggested that as many as six per cent are problem gamblers. But problems can show up when teens are "preoccupied with gambling, get into huge debts, lose friends and do poorly in school."
Gambling on their future/www.canoe.ca/LifewiseLiving0208/09_gambling-sun.html/8.9.02

Preliminary results of a new study, released today by the Responsible Gambling Council (Ontario), reveal that nearly halfof Canadian tweens (aged 9-14) have seen students betting at school and that almost 40% of tweens have made bets within the last year. ...the majority of betting takes place at school especially among 13-14 year olds.
RESPONSIBLE GAMBLING COUNCIL/Canada NewsWire/12.10.01

A survey of seven college campuses, Between 3 and 5 percent of respondents displayed evidence of what Winter called "risky" behavior, meaning their habits seemed likely to develop into pathological gambling problems. 5 percent saying they know a student bookie.
College students bet on slots more than sports, study finds/Sun Herald /8/5/01
I
According to the study, the most popular form of gambling for eighth graders is the lottery, followed by cards, sports betting, bingo and pool. In 11th grade, the most popular form of gambling involved sports betting, followed by pool, cards and the lottery.
Survey says public school students are gambling/AP 2003

"With the Internet, there are casinos in everybody's house, and there are illegal bookmakers on the street corners and at the race course," Robert said. In a survey of 781 Mobile high school students, 66 percent have tried gambling. Although only 38 students, or 6.4 percent, qualified as excessive gamblers, the percentage surpassed Mississippi's 5.5 percent. The part of the study done in Alabama was conducted by University of South Alabama professor Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling. Adolescents who are identified as problem gamblers have often felt peer pressure to gamble, had problems at school or work, or have been arrested.
State lacks a lottery, but not teen gambling/The Birmingham News/07/17/03

New research has revealed one in six of the state's 53,320 students in Years 10, 11 and 12 are playing games such as Keno and buying "scratchie" tickets. "There are more problem gamblers among adolescents than adults," Adelaide University psychologist Dr Paul Delfabbro has told the Sunday Mail. "There is strong evidence to suggest that those who gamble intensively as adolescents are more likely to go on and become problem gamblers." Dr Delfabbro said his studies found those adolescents who admitted to regular gambling also indulged in other high-risk behaviour. Of the students who gambled, 23 per cent also smoked, 32 per cent drank alcohol, 28 per cent smoked marijuana, and 13 per cent took hard drugs.
Revealed: 9000 teen gamblers/Sunday Mail/3.21.04

Alex Blaszczynski, head of medical psychology at Westmead Hospital, said most adolescent gambling problems began between 12 and 15 and were closely linked to parental attitudes.
Problem gambling higher in kids/www.heraldsun.news.com.au/10.21.03

PROBLEM gambling among Adelaide teenagers is a serious issue and is up to three times worse than with adults, the South Australian Government says.
MP warns of teen problem gambling/The Australian News/11.03.05

Mr Mattiga said he was aware of 17 and 18-year-olds "off their head with meth and pokies". "That's a very dangerous cocktail,"
Gamblers flood helpline/The Courier Aust/12.05.05

A Harvard study found that 4.67 percent of young people have a gambling problem. . . Recent research has also shown that college students are more likely to develop a gambling addiction. Pathological gambling, as it is sometimes called, occurs in 1 to 2 percent of the adult population in the United States, while the rates climb to 4 to 8 percent for college students. According to the Pennsylvania study, weekly poker games among male high school and college students increased 84 percent from 2003 to 2004. "Students run up debt and the majority of it ends of on credit cards,” said Sekany. He said that students max out on debt, and have no way to solve the problem. “This leads to lying, stealing, and suicide attempts."
College students struggle with gambling addictions/www.statehornet.com/10.05.05

"We did an intervention with one kid who snuck into his parents' bedroom and racked up $10,000 in an online gambling room before dad woke up,"
Not all fun and games/www.canoe.ca/7.13.05

According to Lori Carter, a youth addictions counsellor at Addiction Services of Thames Valley, about 25,000 to 30,000 youth have gambling problems but very few of these people access addiction counselling or treatment.
Dangers of gambling exposed through play/By Times-Journal Staff/11.09.05

The concern has already been justified by results from many research studies, such as the one in Windsor and those in Quebec by noted researchers Jeffery Derevensky and Rina Gupta of McGill University, and Harold Wynne of Wynne Resources in British Columbia. According to the work done by Gupta, Derevensky and Wynne, gambling rates among youth appear to be rising, with between 4 per cent and 18 per cent of adolescents developing a serious gambling problem. In its resolutions of 1999 with regard to video lottery terminals, the Canadian Public Health Association stated that research has shown that the spouses of problem gamblers report a higher than normal number of suicide attempts, nervous breakdowns and substance abuse, and that the children of problem gamblers have behavioural or adjustment problems related to school, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, running away and arrest.
TESTIMONY Débats du Sénat (hansard) 2e Session, 37e Législature,Volume 140, Numéro 50Le mercredi /L'honorable Dan Hays, Président/4.30.03

Criminal Code Bill to Amend-Second Reading-Debate Adjourned. Hon. Jean Lapointe moved the second reading of Bill S-18, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (lotteries). He said: Honourable senators, it is with great humility that I rise to speak today about Bill S-18. Because while clients who see gambling counsellor Sol Boxenbaum are generally adults, 'when we trace their behaviours,' he says, 'the onset age is about 9.'
How Gambling Lures Kids/www.casinocitytimes.com/1.13.04

Even though it's illegal for teens under 18 to buy lottery tickets in Ontario, Derevensky's survey of 1,072 teenagers last year, done for the provincial Health Department, indicated four out of 10 were playing lottery games... In Manitoba, a survey of 4,500 students by the province's addictions foundation last February showed half of the students had gambled or placed a bet in the last year. Almost 700 of the teens had also played slot machines or video lottery terminals. A 1998 survey by Dalhousie University of 14,000 students in Atlantic Canada schools suggested that as many as six per cent are problem gamblers.
Gambling on their future /www.canoe.ca/ 8.09.02

Preliminary results of a new study, released today by the Responsible Gambling Council (Ontario), reveal that nearly half of Canadian tweens (aged 9-14) have seen students betting at school. The study found that the majority of betting takes place at school especially among 13-14 year olds.
RESPONSIBLE GAMBLING COUNCIL (ONTARIO/Canada NewsWire/2001

Youth gambling, both legal and illegal, is on the rise all across the western world, according to the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviours at McGill University. When young people do gamble, they are more likely than adults to get into serious trouble. The centre says youth are two to four times as likely as their adult counterparts to develop serious problems. Still, a recent report found that 3.8 per cent of the province's youth have gambling problems and 5.7 per cent "display hazardous gambling patterns."
City high school students join poker playing craze/The Edmonton Journal/12.2.04

NOVA SCOTIA -N.S. has 1,500 teens addicted to gambling
About 1,500 adolescents are problem gamblers./The Halifax Herald Limited/1.07.05

Many young people started gambling before age 12, according to a study released yesterday. Hong Kong University survey disclosed.
Gambling still strong in HK, youth at risk/Beijing Time/12.15.05

Betting on sports (gambling) plagues every college campus across America, and has its grasp on nearly seven million college students. From illegal dormitory bookies to offshore booking agencies (which are legal if you are over 21), the amount of college students gambling is at an all-time high. Gambling takes priority over school, organizations, family and work. If someone gets to this point they are usually already in debt up to their ears. The gambler cannot see a future without gambling, which may ultimately lead to suicide if they see no other way out.
G's Spot: Losing it on the Ponies/www.ramcigar.com/3.25.05

In fact, underage gamblers make up a substantial proportion of those with gambling disorders, at least one sociologist says. Henry Lesieur, a sociologist at St. John University, found that there are eight times as many college-aged gambling addicts as adult -aged gambling addicts. Additionally, Time Magazine estimates that one million of the estimated eight million gambling addicts in the United States are teenagers.
Closeup: Youth Gambling on the Rise/TheNewsCourier.com/03/26/2004

The Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania found an 84 percent increase in weekly card playing by young men aged 14 to 22 between 2003 and 2004. About 11 percent of weekly players said they placed bets at online poker sites, the survey stated. Cyndi Moriarity, the president of the Illinois Council on Problem and Compulsive Gambling, said she used to get one call a year to treat teen and college gamblers. Lately she said she's been getting three a month. Therefore, thanks to the the Internet, people under 21 can legally gamble since they are doing so "overseas," right from the comfort of their own homes.
Student wins $120,000 by playing online poker/Daily Illini, IL/5.06.05

According to The State Hornet 4 to 8 percent of all college students the become addicted to gambling. "A Harvard study found that 4.67 percent of young people have a gambling problem. . ."
College students 4 times more likely to become gambling addicts/OnlineCasino.org/06.10.05

Six percent of middle- and high-school students surveyed in Monroe said they gambled daily, twice the rate found two years ago. In the extreme, gambling debts may drive teens to serious crimes, including burglary and selling drugs. Domestic violence can be another result.
Warning Signal On Underage Gambling/pokermag.com/12.14.03

In a time when gambling has become socially acceptable, problem gambling affects 9 percent of youth and only 4 percent of adults. Of the young problem gamblers, 14 percent are gambling on school grounds and nearly 7 percent have been absent from school in order to gamble.
Personal tale puts a face on gambling addiction/Monroe Courier/1.30.03

More and more young people are calling gambling helplines, turning up in gamblers anonymous meetings and seeking help at high school and college counseling centers. Unanimously, those interviewed for this story point to television as a major reason for the increase in poker playing among young people. "There's more responsibility in a 30-second beer ad than an hour-long poker show," Whyte said. "Adults, whether educators or parents, should know that children playing poker is not just harmless fun," McCausland said. "This is gambling and gambling is an addictive activity." McCausland, whose Second Chance Washington foundation promotes legislation to secure permanent funding for treatment and prevention of problem gambling.
Experts, educators wary of poker/www.courierpostonline.com/9.04.05

The announcer seems to be paraphrasing a Maine Sunday Telegram editorial when he says a kiddie casino would turn vulnerable Maine kids, as young as 12 years old, into "accomplished casino patrons."
TV ad shows children gambling in a 'kiddie casino.'/Blethen Maine Newspapers Inc./10.28/03

Adults and the public have a shared responsibility to protect youth from engaging in a risky activity. It is important to teach children and teenagers about the risks involved with gambling.
Why do we try to restrict the access and participation of gambling activities to youth?/McGill University/www.youthgambling.com

Gambling among youth is a growing public health concern. The burden of problem gambling among youth is socially invisible and masked by popular misconceptions. Public perception and knowledge is misguided largely as a result of the promotion of gambling as a harmless form of entertainment and an enjoyable activity.
Problem gambling as a social and public health issue/www.youthgambling.com/

The study concluded that those students who gambled were also much more likely to smoke, drink alcohol, and use illegal drugs according to the 2002 data. There remains an urgent need to protect youth from exposure to gambling products and venues given their especially high vulnerablility of developing a problem and the serious risk of devasting consequences.
GAMBLING WITH DELAWARE’S KIDS (STUDY)/8.4.03/
http://www.education.mcgill.ca/gambling/en/PDF/NewsFlash/Aug. 2003


According to a study by the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 15.9 percent of in-state students between the sixth and 12th grades admit to gambling-related problems or signs of addiction. Four percent report they were already stealing money from relatives to gamble.
And Unsafe Bet For Families/www.family.org/cforum/fosi/gambling/nac/a0038984.cfm/Chad Hills/2.20.06

With lotteries often being sold to voters as a way to help school kids, it is ironic that the gambling craze sweeping the adult world is sucking many kids in as well. That danger is what motivates Jeffrey Derevensky, who helps head up the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviours at McGill University in Montreal. He believes adolescents should be warned about the dangers of gambling.
Coming Up SnakeEyes/headlines.agapepress.org/archive/4.10.06

Rhode Island-based GTech's (manages games for the Missouri Lottery) "After School Advantage" program provides schools and nonprofit community agencies with state-of-the-art computer gear designed to give at-risk latchkey children, ages 5 to 15, an entertaining but meaningful learning experience during after-school hours. Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder and other dignitaries are expected for ceremonies Thursday at the school.
Computer gift for school/The Kansas City Star/3.22.06

Attorneys General from across the nation are urging Congress to pass legislation outlawing Internet gambling. Simply because the game is played online does not erase the problems associated with gambling. States must still address issues of game integrity, effective consumer dispute resolution procedures, access to gambling by minors, money laundering and other criminal activity, as well as compulsive gambling.
States Want Congress To Outlaw Internet Gambling
/http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2006/03/online_gambling.html/3.22.06


Experts tell us the earlier a person starts to gamble, the greater the risk of becoming a compulsive gambler. In another survey, 96 percent of adult male recovering gamblers said they started gambling before age 14.
TOPIC OF THE DAY: Compulsive gambling/Asbury Park Press /ByArnie Wexler/3.20.06

The Problem Gamblers Help Network of West Virginia is concerned about teen gambling. The network reports that 14 percent of the people they have helped since 2000 started gambling before the age of 18...
Help stop teen gambling/ http://sundaygazettemail.com/section/News/FlipSide/2006031741 /3.18.06

But young people barely understand the serious risks involved, say experts. Of the 454 youth surveyed there for Gregg's thesis study, about 90 percent had gambled at least once in the past year; nine percent reported that they were at risk for developing problems and five percent reported behaviour consistent with problem gambling. Young people gamble on activities such as video games, school lottos and bingos, arcades, sports betting, dice, pogs, raffles, dares, handheld poker machines, unregulated internet games, pool or other games of skill. The McGill centre noted a large-scale study of adolescents in Alberta that found the average problem gambler started gambling at age 10 and it says similar results were found in other studies around the world. Young problem gamblers can be more prone to delinquency, criminal behaviour, disrupted family and peer relationships and lower school performance and work activities. A 1998 Harvard Medical School study found teen gamblers are three times more likely to become addicted than their adult counterparts because they lack impulse control, and the younger the age of initial exposure, the higher the incidence.
We're Raising Gamblers/ http://thetyee.ca/News/2006/04/13/RaisingGamblers/4.13.06

Internet gambling has become the pastime of choice for many young Americans, but there is often a high price to pay for what can be a very dangerous game. But with the explosion in popularity of poker - live and on the internet - more young people are now getting into serious trouble. "He was in tears, like: 'I gotta talk to you dad'. He was crying and I woke up completely mentally then from thinking it was just a normal phone call. He shocked me in a way. "He said 'I'm having a problem. I'm very deeply in debt and I owe money'. I thought he said $1,800 but he said 'no dad, it's $18,000 dollars'." Ryan's mother remembers the shock and disbelief at discovering how destructive her son's gambling had become. "I mean, you look at him and you can't tell he's a gambler. He looks fine, he's a handsome guy, polite. It's something the gambler hides." Most schools and colleges already have programmes designed to raise awareness about the dangers of drugs, alcohol and sexually transmitted diseases. But they have nothing about gambling. According to the National Council on Problem Gambling, those between the ages of 18 and 24 are showing the highest rates of gambling addictions. The lack of awareness among parents, schools and colleges about gambling's hidden dangers is contributing to youth gambling addiction becoming a real social problem in America.
Online poker's grip on US youth /http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/crossing_continents /4806660.stm/3.15.06

The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer reported last spring that more than 70 percent of youths ages 10 to 17 gambled in the past year, up from 45 percent in 1988. A study of America's 11- to 18-year-olds showed that 4 percent to 7 percent had demonstrated problem gambling behaviors. And mountains of debt and ruined credit are not the worst results. The National Council on Problem Gambling reports that one in five pathological gamblers attempts suicide, a rate higher than for any other addictive disorder.
Online gambling is society's issue/3.12.06
www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/viewpoints/articles/0312shadegg0312.html/

Steve has the jaded, world-weary air of a veteran gambler. The trouble is, he's just 17 years old. It is illegal for under-18s, but he found the age verification systems of his chosen websites 'very, very easy' to fool. But Steve betrays many of the tell-tale signs of a problem gambler. He says he thinks about poker 'pretty much all the time', gets 'a real buzz' from a good hand of cards, and admits the game distracts him from his college work and social life. The craze has rippled through American universities and high schools. A University of Pennsylvania study found 2.9 million young people gambled at least once a week with cards, and 580,000 aged 14 to 22 gambled weekly on the net.
Online poker hooks teenagers/ http://technology.guardian.co.uk/news/story/ 0,,1729148,00.html/3.12.06

MO - A couple of Bismarck Booster Club fund-raisers are raising quite a stir. The booster club recently hosted a pair of Texas Hold'em poker tournaments in the cafeteria of the Bismarck High School, with the last tournament occurring in January.
http://www.mydjconnection.com/articles/2006/03/08/community/news3.txt
Park Hills Daily Journal, MO/3.08.06

Children as young as 10 are logging on to internet poker sites that offer free practice games, McGill University psychologist Jeffrey Deverensky said at the end of a two-day conference hosted by Nova Scotia Gaming Corp. Many young people with gambling problems cite early exposure to internet gambling, he said.
Internet breeds generation of young gamblers:expert/www.cbcunlocked.com/artman/ publish/article_645.shtml/10.04.05

A coffee shop, was already under investigation when "we had reports that kids were coming down from the high school and playing the games," Bridgeport Police Chief Steve Studenc said. Last week, an officer in plain clothes was sent into the shop, where he allegedly received a payoff from one of the gambling machines.
Victimizing adults is bad enough — but involving teenagers is worse.
Don't Let Gambling Victimize Youths/News-Register/3.4.06

However, a study by the Minnesota Institute of Public Health found that gambling is a significant problem for 5 percent of college students.
Most people don't realize they have a gambling problem for seven or eight years, he said. Whether it starts in high school, college or later in life, he said gambling addictions usually lead to financial destruction, broken marriages, ruined friendships and ultimately, unhappiness.
Professors pick brains of gamblers/SIU - Daily Egyptian, IL /3.02.06

The State Council on Problem Gambling estimates 270,000 adults and 44,000 teens in Washington have had a severe gambling problem.
State Sees More Problem Gamblers/KVEW, WA/ 3.02.06

You've talked to your kids about the dangers of drugs, alcohol and cigarettes. What about gambling? Research shows nearly 60 percent of children between the ages of 14 and 22 gamble at least once a month.
He started gambling when he was only 10-years-old...By the time he was 25, Mike knew he had a problem.
Online Odds/KXAN-TV/3.01.06

Gambling is not just a problem for adults, it's a growing problem among kids. "I've got nothing, I've gambled in my life everything away, every penny," he said. "I've gambled sneakers away. He dates his gambling to age 10, when he would buy lottery tickets.
Teen Gambling/NBC30.com,CT/ 3.01.06

But the Consumer Credit Counselling Service is warning students that it often deals with people who have racked up gambling debts of up to 20,000. "A lot of students are playing poker online and some are addicted," he says. "I know of one who lost 4,000 in a week."
Internet poker players gamble with their debt/TMCnet/2.26.06

It's a hidden addiction with no overdose, no drugs to ingest, and no drug test to pinpoint it. But make no mistake, compulsive gambling can injure, even destroy families — especially when the addict is a teenager. However, counselors warn the Texas Hold-em "high" teens get may put them at risk for a lifelong addiction. He said it's a habit that can tear a family apart as they search for answers. "What do I do? I'm bailing them out. I'm in debt. They're in debt. They're in trouble. They are still living with me. They've stolen everything I've got," Harris said. "It gets out of control." "We've seen them in restaurants, we've seen them in little mom-and-pop businesses," First Assistant District Attorney Cliff Herberg said. "And so, they're there for anybody to access, including children. Arcades, we've seen them in video arcades."
Young gamblers are on the rise nationwide/www.mysanantonio.com/news/metro/stories/MY SA022406.teengambling.kens.5e003d69.html/2.24.06

In fact, says George, in a quest for fun activities to keep teens out of trouble, schools across Minnesota are hosting casino nights, complete with green-felt poker tables and parents dressed up as Las Vegas card dealers. They are the first generation to grow up with completely legalized gambling, amid raves about its contribution to meager state coffers and aggressive casino advertising. Numerous studies have established that the rate at which adolescents develop gambling problems is considerably higher compared to that among adults, with a watershed Harvard Medical School meta-analysis estimating adolescent rates at three to four times higher. Studies have also shown that the younger players are when they start, the higher the likelihood of lapsing into compulsive gambling. the Council on Compulsive Gambling hotline has seen a number of recent calls from parents of problem teen gamblers, including one from the parents of a Bismarck high school sophomore who racked up $14,000 on their credit cards playing Texas Hold'em online and with friends. A North High student newspaper story recently proclaimed "Gambling on the Rise Among North High School Students" Lewis hears from her son, a Fargo South High senior and occasional player, that some kids in his poker circle -- "We’re talking straight A students," she says -- are losing up to $300 a week.
The gamble kids take: Taking chances/THE FORUM/ 10.29.05

The Justice Department considers Internet gambling illegal at any age. Dan Romer, director of the Risk Survey of Youth at the Annenberg Center, said he hopes universities and parents take notice of what is going on behind closed doors. "The awareness is just not there yet that some kids who are exposed to this are going to get hooked," he said.
Internet gambling latest campus trend www.uecrescent.org/articles/stories/public/ 200602/24/0003VVZZ_news.html/2.24.06

Do we really believe it's acceptable to get young people addicted to gambling at an earlier age? Is the marketing campaign theme here "A young gambler is a lifelong gambler?" Carry their logic a little further. Why not market to high school kids? Even though they can't buy tickets until age 18, we could prepare some fertile soil here to plant the seeds of addiction.
Selling lottery to youths a bad bet/http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/opinion/ 260460_skip23.html/2.23.06

The percentage of college gamblers participating in online betting has almost doubled, from 11.7 percent in 2000 to 20.9 percent in 2005, according to the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey. 5 percent of gamblers calling the helpline are adolescents -- up 3 percent since 2001.
Online Holds 'em/Oklahoma Daily, OK/2.22.06

A study released in Sept. 2005 by the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center reported that 14.2 percent of young people ages 14 to 22 gambled online at least once a month (19.6 percent of males in that range) and that 54.5 percent of young people who gambled weekly showed common signs of problem gambling.
FULL HOUSE: Gambling trend spreading at STJ/St. John's University The Torch, NY/2.15.06

Young adults are among the highest risk groups for developing gambling problems and seven per cent of young Ontario adults experienced moderate to severe problems.
Program cautions students about gambling/Tb News Source/10.24.05

Several GAMES Gambling Awareness in Monroe members have produced a video about preventing problem gambling that had its debut at the meeting. Fernandes said the Department of Mental Health and Addiction, which sponsors GAMES, is interested in presenting the video to high schools around the state. According to Laster (Regional Youth/Adult Substance Abuse Project), the demographics of compulsive gambling is changing. The addiction that once predominately affected white males now applies to women and teenagers.
GAMES grows at Masuk/Monroe Courier, CT/ 9.29.05

Towns was a 16-year-old Suffolk College student when the gambling bug bit. He and his friends used to go a café on the corner of Eagle Street and Upper Orwell Street in Ipswich during dinner breaks to play a fruit machine.
Gambling addict wanted arcade ban/
http://www.eveningstar.co.uk/Content/news/story.asp?atetime=30+Sep+2005+
02%3A45&tbrand=ESTOnline&tCategory=News&category=News&brand=
ESTOnline&itemid=IPED28+Sep+2005+10%3A59%3A43%3A687/9.30.05

Today's gambling stats are staggering -- and distressing. More than 3 million teenagers get together to play poker weekly for money, a number that has doubled in the last two years, according to the Annenberg Public Policy Center. "About one-third of my calls are kids hooked on poker," notes Arnie Wexler, who has counseled compulsive gamblers for 37 years and operates 888 LASTBET.
Gambling's new teenage heroes (and victims)/San Francisco Chronicle/1.11.06

But for growing numbers of players who are betting on cards, sports, and other games, gambling has sent them into the downward spiral of personal and financial destruction. And those most at risk are kids who gamble. And for them -- gambling is everywhere. Dr. J. Michael Faragher, with the Problem Gambling Research and Treatment Center at the University of Denver, said because of the popularity of gambling, kids are much more at risk. Whether adult or adolescent, the symptoms of a compulsive gambler are the same. "It was a really big carousel of insanity is what it was," Mike said.
Gambling Addicts Getting Younger, Experts Say/TheDenverChannel.com/ 2.03.06

MO - The Port Authority of Kansas City, Mo., recently awarded grants to Washington University in St. Louis and University of Missouri-Columbia.
The Port Authority granted a total of more than $160,000 to three organizations to fund awareness programs and research to prevent youth gaming, the authority said in a release.
Washington U., U of Mo. receive grants to address youth gambling/ http://stlouis.bizjournals.com/stlouis/stories/2006/01/30/daily59.html/1.30.06

"Gambling on sports is highly popular, not only among adults, but with young people who are gambling in growing numbers," Fowler (FCCG Executive Director) said. "In fact, Florida's most recent youth survey found that more than 55% of students in grades 6-12 report having gambled in the last year."
Odds favor record betting on this year's Super Bowl/
http://www.tampabays10.com/sports/sports_article.aspx?storyid=24875/2.03.06

According to the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, the number of American men between the ages of 14 and 22 who gamble at least once a month increased by 20 percent in 2005.
Jeremiah Weinstock, a postdoctoral fellow at University of Connecticut Health Center, said gambling addiction can cause poor grades, involvement in risky behaviors like drinking and using drugs, trouble with family and friends and isolation.
Gambling tempts many students
http://www.cm-life.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2006/02/03/43e2e4be97b39 /2.03.06

* * * Danger signs
Indicators of possible gambling problem in students:
1. Unexplained absences from school
2. Sudden drop in grades
3. Change of personality (irritability, impatience, criticism or sarcasm)
4. Large amounts of money in students' possession; bragging about winning or gambling
5. Does the student have an unusual interest in newspapers, magazines or periodicals having to do with sports or horse racing or lotteries?
6. Intense interest in gambling conversations
7. Exaggerated display of money or other material possessions (e.g., cars, clothes, jewelry)
8. Change in behavior (school absences, behavior problems)
9. Gambling language in his/her conversation (5-timer, 10-timer, bookie, loan shark, point spread, underdog or favorite)
10. Exaggerated use of word "bet" in his/her vocabulary
11. Sports gambling tickets and or lottery tickets in their possession
12. Playing of gambling-type games on the Internet.
Source: The New Jersey Council on Compulsive Gambling

Mike, a 49-year-old Passaic County resident who is a computer specialist with a pharmaceutical company, also was introduced to gambling by running football slips in high school. After he saw a couple of payments being handed out, he was hooked. "For 17 years, I could not go 24 hours without betting," said Mike. When he was earning $45,000 in 1985, he estimates he was betting more than $45,000 a month for six months.
Their life is a gamble/NorthJersey.com/2.03.06

Eyewitness News has uncovered the dangers of internet gambling and why it's so easy for underage kids to get in deep online. All a player has to do is create a password, put in an e-mail address, and then click a button that says he or she is over the age of 21. Then the player can get chips enters a credit card number or connecting their account to a bank account. The bidding can go all the way up to $25,000.
Kids Gambling Away Thousands of Dollars Online/http://www.myeyewitnessnews.com /news/local/story.aspx?content_id=7729E242-0B11-49EE-81B4-824A788C2DA8/2.01.06

According to the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors in Canada reported that the thrill of it, not the money, is the primary motivation for gambling among young people. "When playing, adolescents with serious gambling problems report that nothing else matters, and that they are able to forget about their problems."
When the chips are down ...online gambling - Good or Bad?/Journal Gazette and Times-Courier, IL/2.02.06

Ed Looney, Council on Compulsive Gambling of N.J.: "We have an epidemic. We're not getting any education at the schools, we're not getting any."
The seduction and dangers of online betting/abclocal.go.com/ wabc/story?section=local&id=3869366/2.02.06

"The rising rate of card playing and overall gambling is worrisome," said Dan Romer, director of the survey. "Young people are more prone to addiction, and increased exposure to gambling during the adolescent years increases the chances of developing gambling-related problems."
Meanwhile, the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors in Canada reported that a study in Alberta found the average gambler began the habit at age 10.
Therapists fear 'wave' of gambling addicts/Journal Gazette and Times-Courier/2.01.06

The good news is that some students are moving away from drug use but on the down side they are said to be turning to gambling.
Gambling in schools/http://www.cbc.bb/content/view/3916/10/1.31.06

When New Jersey resident Shari Goldstein (not her real name) walked into her nephew's sports-themed bar mitzva party in December, she was "flabbergasted." There was a separate kids' area with gambling tables among the batting cages and baseballs. "And then I walked over and saw my nine-year-old and 13-year-old nephews playing Texas Hold 'Em. The kids were glued to the table." Our kids are gambling and playing cards and not just for chips or for fun, but for money. Not a couple of dollars but big money. Hundreds of dollars. Sometimes thousands. It's a dangerous road, and parents are in denial." Experts warn that compulsive gambling is fast becoming a major issue among adolescents and college students. "I think we’re going to start seeing more and more kids running up huge debts gambling. For those who will get addicted, it's not going to pass. THE PROBLEM with games of chance, say experts, is not that everyone who gambles will become addicted, but rather that introducing gambling as a social norm provides the opportunity for those predisposed to addiction to get hurt. "There's the high, the rush, and the crash afterwards…," he said. "Kids can lose thousands of dollars, depending on their resources and where they go to get their money.
Addictive behavior can start early, according to Abrams. "It starts at the time they learn to play cards, sports, and are watching television. It can certainly start under 10 years old. Twerski, author of a soon-to-be published book on gambling in the Jewish community (tentatively titled It’s More than Dreidl), pointed out that "kids are risk-takers and while adults have a sense of responsibility, adolescents don't have it yet," and they get into trouble.
All In? The gambling craze is giving religious leaders fits/New Jersey Jewish News/1.26.06

When a local bookie demanded that Jay either pay up or take a beating, the University of Maryland student might have realized he had a gambling problem. But until antigambling education is the norm in grade school, the fact that gambling appears to have taken off with the "beautiful people" won't help.
Campuses Slow To Deal With Gambling/http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/01/25/ national/main1236359.shtml/1.25.06

According to the Illinois Institute for Addiction Recovery (www.addictionrecov.org /youthgam.htm) and other sources, 80 percent or more of those between 12 and 17 say they have gambled in the past 12 months, with one third of them gambling at least once a week. Her son began gambling in high school and then got even more serious about it at a Snohomish County Indian casino. Throughout his 20s he was hooked on gambling and heavily in debt. He eventually entered a rehab program. But three months after that ended, and so far in debt he couldn't afford to properly maintain his car, he died in an auto accident that McCausland says was due to the car's condition.
Time to Fold 'Em/http://www.columbian.com/opinion/news/01172006news112135.cfm/1.17.06

Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling, says gambling is "the most popular high-risk activity among teenagers, outpacing drinking, taking drugs and smoking." In fact, eighth graders who gamble are three-times more likely than non-gamblers to have stolen money, been involved in a fight, shoplifted, or gotten into trouble with the police."
Teen Poker Dangers/CBS News/1.18.06

"But for that small percentage, which is comparable to the percentage that develops serious drug problems -- (gambling addiction) is a life-threatening disorder." She says about one-fourth of people in compulsive-gambling treatment programs attempt suicide. Michael R. Stone, executive director of the Kentucky Council on Problem Gambling, says studies have shown nearly 4 percent of teens are pathological, or compulsive, gamblers. "Most parents know you don't sponsor beer parties," Rugle says. "But they're happy as clams to sponsor poker parties.
Gambling with your future/Asbury Park Press/01.10.06

More than 3 million teenagers get together to play poker weekly for money, a number that has doubled in the last two years, according to the Annenberg Public Policy Center. "About one-third of my calls are kids hooked on poker," notes Arnie Wexler, who has counseled compulsive gamblers for 37 years and operates 888 LASTBET. "They're getting younger and younger." Today more young people gamble once a week than smoke, drink or take drugs combined. Terry Elman, education co-ordinator for the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey, says more and more kids are getting sucked in over their heads by the online poker boom.
The youthful lure of online poker/news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4230630.stm/9.11.05

Internet Web sites lure an ever-increasing number of teenage bettors. High school boys are so wrapped up in card games that they leave teenage girls high and dry on weekends. "The rising rate of card playing and overall gambling is worrisome," said Dan Romer, research director of the Adolescent Risk Communication Institute at University of Pennsylvania. "Young people are more prone to addiction, and increased exposure to gambling during the adolescent years increases the chances of developing gambling-related problems." "Parents and students need to know this is not a risk-free activity," he said. Wuelfing (Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling) hears from troubled teenagers who have sold their possessions and even sold drugs, not to get high, but to pay off gambling debts. Card playing for money among children as young as 11 and 12 comes as no surprise to Christine Reilly, director of the Institute for Research on Pathological Gaming, affiliated with Harvard Medical School."Adolescents are particularly susceptible to addictions," Romer said. And, he noted, the younger the exposure, the more likely the addiction if one is susceptible.
Youth gambling increase raises concerns/Eagle TribuneJan 8, 2006/By Marjory Sherman/1.08.06

Pathological gambling is estimated to occur at the rate of 4 to 7 percent in teenagers. Pathological gambling is a mental disorder characterized by a compulsive need to gamble more and more money, to lie about the extent of one's gambling and to be unable to stop or reduce gambling.
An early "big" win, pre-existing mental disorders such as depression or anxiety, and stressful life events also seem to increase the risks.
Emily E. Wilson (Emily E. Wilson is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Huntington and has completed advanced training in gambling addictions with the Problem Gamblers Network of West Virginia:
Know the facts to prevent gambling addictions in teens/Huntington Herald Dispatch/1.04.06

"Kids playing poker is like kids playing with loaded guns because one in 10 will not be able to get up," said Jennifer McCausland, whose Second Chance Washington foundation promotes legislation to secure permanent funding for treatment and prevention of problem gambling.
"The country is not equipped for the addictions that are going to follow this."
Experts, educators wary of poker/Courier-Post/9.04.05

Reaching past his PE kit and packed lunch, David Archer draws a roulette wheel out of his schoolbag. The 13-year-old "bookmaker" lays it on the ground and sets it spinning.
Betting Slips Up A Level/The Enterprise North East/9.02.05

National studies show the number of young people gambling on poker and other card games has skyrocketed in recent years, but while poker is a harmless diversion for most teens, experts caution the risks of gambling addiction are being overlooked. "But for that small percentage, which is comparable to the percentage that develops serious drug problems -- (gambling addiction) is a life-threatening disorder." She (Dr. Lori Rugle, a clinical psychologist and president of the Ohio Council on Problem Gambling) says about one-fourth of people in compulsive-gambling treatment programs attempt suicide.
Studies: Gambling by teens climbing/Jackson Clarion Ledger/12.28.05

Kevin started playing (poker) at age 15. As his losses inevitably swelled, Kevin -- without hesitation or remorse -- started looting a $30,000 college fund set up by his parents. "I didn't care if I won or lost," said Kevin, who went through $7,000 in three months. "I just wanted to gamble."
According to a study by the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 15.9 percent of in-state students between the sixth and 12th grades admit to gambling-related woes or signs of addiction. Four percent report they were already stealing money from relatives to gamble. But Ed Looney, who followed Wexler as head of the New Jersey council, cites the 80-15-5 rule. "Eighty percent of the kids who gamble, there will be no impact on their lives," Looney said. "Fifteen percent will have some problem. And 5 percent will become addicted." The risk of pathological gambling runs about twice as high among adolescents (5 percent) as it does among adults (3 percent), said Dr. Carlos Blanco, head of the gambling clinic at the Columbia University Medical Center. Cross-addiction is a fairly common problem; researchers at the National Council on Problem Gambling found that teens with a gambling problem were more likely to engage in risky behavior such as unsafe sex, binge drinking and skipping school. Gamblers also have the highest suicide rate of any addicted group. A 19-year-old New Yorker lost $6,000 on the 1997 World Series, then killed himself and left a note citing his debt. "Particularly over the last five, six years, it's getting younger and younger (Gamblers Anonymous meetings)," said the 50-year-old New Jersey resident. "We've seen more teens than ever before."
Poker Flops Teens Into Gambling /Addiction/www.thebostonchannel.com/family/4919839/detail.html /8.31.05

Maybe it started with Yu-Gi-Oh trading cards or Pokemon games.
As the years went by, the Texas Hold'em poker mania may have kicked in.
But for some youngsters, what started as innocent fun can grow into a crippling gambling addiction. Even video games targeting young people offer entry points into casino gambling. While many gambling outlets, from the lottery to online poker, might seem harmless, she said not addressing the issue with youngsters actually was sending them a message that they are simply games and pose no danger. "Our kids, younger and younger, even at the elementary school level, are getting exposed to gambling," Thrumston (a member of the state PTA committee that examined the issue)
PTA tries to curb youth gambling said. "It is something that can develop into addicting behavior. /"http://www.sptimes.com/2005/12/23 /Citrus/PTA_tries_to_curb_you.shtml/12.23.05

"The word, conservatively, is 'epidemic,' " says Edward Looney, executive director of the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey. "Younger people are more prone to addiction than older people." (Dan Romer, director of the Annenberg survey) "We're seeing a lot of good kids with gambling problems," Looney says. He estimates that 5% of gamblers develop serious problems. "We're not communicating adequately the risks," says Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling. "Government, which typically deals with these issues, has a conflict of interest," he says, because states profit from gambling ventures such as casinos and lotteries. Those who've been addicted know the rush, and the risks. "It was a euphoric feeling. It was a need, a drug," (he started gambling at 15, just embezzled $500,000 to pay gambling debts).
It's always poker night on campus/USA TODAY/12.22.05

The first part of this story takes place last week when the 19-year-old walked into a Wachovia bank in east Allentown, Pa., and told the teller he had a gun. G.H. then left the bank with $2,871 and a noose around his neck. After attending a $19,000-a-year private high school in Ohio, paid for by his Baptist minister father, H. chose Lehigh and was leading a hectic life playing second chair cello, working part-time in the chaplain's office, and serving as class president. What is uncommon is that somehow, H. went far above his bankroll and lost roughly $5,000 playing online poker.
Lehigh Robbery Raises Questions/http://www.pokernews.com/news/2005/12/lehigh-robbery-raises.htm/12.22.05

Playing quarter games at the fair and getting lost for hours in the adventure of the arcade are vivid memories for Dave Hemken of Ames. Hemken said childhood games and the competitive nature of his family might have contributed to what became a lifetime addiction to gambling.  "I kept going for the adrenaline rush," he said. "I would do anything to play and anything to win."
A holiday hazard/Ames Daily Tribune/12.17.05

That 10-year-olds are approved to gamble in North Dakota is unacceptable. You can dress it up with the name, "charitable gaming," but that doesn't change what it is. It's gambling. It is a strange thought - of 10- or 11-year-olds hitting big jackpots in bingo and having to file federal tax returns on their winnings. Equally as bizarre is that they would have to fill out the line on the return declaring their losses. There is no good reason for them to be gambling.
Cash bingo not for kids /www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2005/12/07/news/editorials/106580.txt /12.07.05

Michael Stone, the executive director of the Kentucky Council on Problem Gambling reported this week that nearly 4 percent of US teenaged gamblers are compulsive gamblers. Experts have previously reported that the risk of addictive habits developing are greater in players who win rewards whilst young, especially teenagers.
YOUNG POKER PLAYERS DOMINATE/http://www.online-casinos.com/news/news1472.asp/12.09.05

From what is known about alcoholism and drug addiction among teens, it should come as no surprise to learn that kids are at an elevated risk for developing a gambling addiction. A Harvard Medical School study found that youth are at 3-4 times the risk of adults for developing problems with gambling and that many gambling addicts report gambling as young as 11 years old. Teens who are recovering from another addiction, such as drug dependency or alcoholism, are at an even greater risk for developing a gambling addiction.
When Gambling is no Longer a Game http://www.aapress.com/archive/2005/webdec23/h-gambling.htm/2005

"We do know the younger somebody gets involved in gambling, the higher risk they are to develop (addiction) problems, and also (to engage in) other high-risk behaviors: drugs, alcohol, nicotine and risky sex." (Dr. Lori Rugle, a clinical psychologist and president of the Ohio Council on Problem Gambling)
Do teens know when to hold 'em?/Cincinnati Enquirer/12.06.05

A two-year study on problem gambling was presented to the 2003 Legislature, estimating there could be up to 53,500 adult pathological gamblers in Nevada. And it found that children as young at 11 years old in Nevada become problem gamblers and as many as 4,000 adolescents have experienced severe difficulties related to gambling. The study was performed by Rachel Volberg of Gemini Research, Ltd. It said problem gamblers are "significantly more likely to smoke daily and to use marijuana on a monthly basis" compared to non-problem gamblers.
State appoints nongambler to oversee problem gambling grants program/
lasvegassun.com/8.09.05\


According to a Harvard study a few years ago, 4.67% of young people have a gambling problem. Experts tell us that the earlier a person starts to gamble, the greater the risk of them becoming a compulsive gambler. In another survey, 96% of adult male recovering gamblers' stated that they started gambling before the age of 14. The average age of people seeking help for a gambling problem is getting much younger every day..
Arnie Wexler (aswexler@aol.com) (one of the nations' leading expert on compulsive gambling)

BISMARCK, N.D. - At least three bingo parlors in North Dakota recently began allowing children as young as 10 to play, a change that might bring a closer look from the next Legislature. Stan Stelter said bingo parlors should not send a message that it is OK for children to gamble. "I don't think there should be a family atmosphere in a gambling place," he said.
More bingo parlors allow ten-year-olds to play /http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news /13294979.htm/11.30.05

INDIANAPOLIS — About 3 percent of Indiana high school students told researchers they have bet at a casino, even though the minimum age to board an Indiana riverboat for gambling is 21. A total of 4.4 percent of seniors said they had gambled at a casino at least once, according to an annual survey released this week by the Indiana Prevention Resource Center at Indiana University. Slightly more than 1 percent of seniors said they gambled at casinos weekly or daily.
3 percent of high schoolers admit betting/
www.fortwayne.com/mld/fortwayne/news/local/12303201.htm/8.04.05


The Palm Harbor Community Center in Palm Harbor Florida came under fire recently after hosting a poker night for youth, aged 11 to 17.
Florida Teen Poker Game Gets the Boot/http://www.onlinepokernews.com/20050730/ florida_teen_poker_game_gets_the_dbc.aspx/7.30.05

Others, including Senator Charles Schumer of New York, are troubled by the fact that, in practice, there is no age limitation on online gambling because there is no true age identification process. As Senator Schumer said, "These online gambling sites think they have really hit the jackpot by targeting kids." One study found that out of 37 randomly selected online gambling sites, a minor was able to register, play, and pay at 30 of them.
My College Addiction/http://www.alternet.org/wiretap/23792/AlterNet, CA

The risk of gambling addiction among youths isn't amusing or child's play. The explosion of gambling in all types of venues -- especially including the present craze over poker online and on cable TV -- is driving more and more young people to bet their after-school money, their college fund or, tragically in some cases, even their own lives on gambling's many forms.
Recently, I alerted the state Gambling Commission to reports of teens gambling in area casinos during high school lunch breaks. State investigators found that at five of seven casinos, a 16-year-old sent in as part of a sting investigation was allowed to gamble and buy alcohol.
Poker, Internet gambling, and Black Jack became the sole beneficiaries of Ben's finances; maintaining his car was not a priority. The police report stated Ben died after losing control of his car due to mechanical failure. Actually Ben died after losing control of his life to gambling. It started as an innocent after-school poker game and ended with his car wrapped around a tree.
Teens are gambling with their lives/Seattle Post Intelligencer/12.08.05

"This is the first generation to grow up with gambling that is legal and aggressively promoted in their state," Whyte said. "There are 48 states that have legalized gambling." (Keith Whyte, the executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling)
Poker's new face/www.abqtrib.com/7.18.05

That is what worries Looney, who advises parents to monitor their children's playing. "Don't play for money," he says. "Play for the fun of it and the competitiveness. When you put the gambling aspect in it, it is illegal. Set the standard."
Poker rush has all hands on deck/Newark Star Ledger, NJ/7.17.05

Thomas Talley, Certified Gambling Counselor: "It's an adult toy, it's for gambling, it's illegal under age 18. This is sending the wrong message to kids. According to a 2002 study from FCCG, 115,000 young people between 13 and 17 years of age in Florida are at-risk for becoming compulsive gamblers. "Jake," Recovering compulsive gambler: "My gambling started when I was 12-years-old Over the years it got worse. His daily routine: wake up in the afternoon, hit the casino, stay until the morning, and skip class. In fact, in three years of school, he only finished three classes and his debt climbed to $10,000.
Steer kids ofgambling/www.tampabays10.com/aroundthebay/ aroundthebay_article.aspx?storyid=21915/12.01.05

Kids celebrate their birthdays with poker parties. Poker is getting credit for reviving good old-fashioned face-to-face socializing among middle-schoolers and older teenagers, some of whom are letting their video games gather dust. Despite poker's growing popularity and squeaky-clean makeover, the dark side of the game lingers. People still spend long, sedentary, isolated hours playing Internet poker, unable to yank themselves away from the screen.
Poker Face/Boston Globe/7.3.05

The number of children in Florida considered problem gamblers is more than twice the national average, according to an exclusive Problem Solvers investigation. Gambling is illegal for anyone under the age of 18 but that is not stopping a new generation of pre-teens, Problem Solver Nancy Alvarez said. Local 6 News showed video of a poker game in Central Florida being played by 10-year-old boys. "There is certainly a connection between what age a child is exposed to gambling and the propensity for their developing a problem later in life," Fowler (Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling) said.
Poker, Gambling Captures Attention Of Fla. Pre-Teens/
http://www.local6.com/money/5367429/detail.html/11.20.05


What's more, they say, those sites (internet gambling) can and do corrupt children and create more addicted gamblers. Kids can get onto some of the overseas sites, as Alex Hartman, the 16-year-old son of 60 Minutes Producer Rome Hartman, demonstrated. Using his dad's credit card, he gained access to a gaming Web site and quickly lost $100 playing roulette.
ONLINE GAMBLING ON 60 MINUTES THIS SUNDAY
http://www.online-casinos.com/news/news1392.asp/11.18.05


A TEENAGE gambling addict who stole almost £800 from his mother's boss has been jailed.
Teen gambler jailed for theft from mum's boss/ http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/viewarticle.aspx?id=302650/11.17.05

But addiction specialist Sandy Klepner is worried about the growing number of teens she sees turning to gambling for fun. "If you have 10 kids playing, two of them are going to have problems," she said. "So that's pretty high." He had no idea until months later that his teenage son had moved on from games in his Long Island neighborhood and was instead sneaking into Manhattan -- gambling at various underground poker rooms. "We thought he was at the movies with his friend," the father said.
Poker's Popularity Means More Teen Gambling Addicts/ABC News/11.16.05

A computer, an Internet hook up and access to a credit card can become a dangerous mix for an adolescent looking for a bit of online gambling.
A child can gamble virtually undetected if a parent doesn't monitor the activity.
Online gambling: A losing bet for kids/The State, SC/11.14.05

The National Council on Problem Gambling in Washington estimates that about 5 percent of children under 18 have a gambling problem. "That's (wireless) the last thing any compulsive gambler needs, especially an underage gambler," said Terry Elman, education coordinator for the council's New Jersey office. "This could push them over the edge." State Sen. Maggie Carlton, who cast the lone vote in the Nevada Legislature against handhelds, said the device "looks like a toy, and kids love toys."
Wireless gambling is now legal in Las Vegas/Oct. 16, 2005/www.philly.com/mld/philly/ 12912005.htm/10.16.05

More students are taking their academics seriously, and feel optimistic about the future. Also, use of tobacco and marijuana is also down, according to the surveyed students. But while the results of the poll were largely mixed, there was one clear signal sent out by the study: Youth gambling is decidedly on the rise. But young people especially have a very difficult time dealing with what can be the tremendous pressures of gambling and the debt it usually brings.
New warning flags on youth gambling/www.connpost.com/opinion/10.17.05

According to Lori Carter, a youth addictions counsellor at Addiction Services of Thames Valley, about 25,000 to 30,000 youth have gambling problems but very few of these people access addiction counselling or treatment. "It starts so small and gets so out of control ... and leads to other problems," said Ashley Jackson, 17.
Dangers of gambling exposed through playYoung people at risk/St. Thomas Times-Journal, Canada/11.9.05

Information from nearly 6,700 Grade 7-12 Manitoba students shows 38 per cent have taken part in some form of gambling within the last year.
The report shows 63 per cent of kids started gambling socially before their 10th birthday.
38 % of Grade 7-12 pupils gamble: study/ www.brandonsun.com/story.php?story_id=7064 /10.15.05

MO - Frank Heckler with the Chamber says, "The (Pinnacle casino's) bowling alley, the theater, the aquatic center those things that were here back when I moved into the area in 1950. We're finally going to see a revitalization of those amenities for the kids in this area to really enjoy it again."
Pinnacle Unveils Plans For South County Casino Complexwww.ksdk.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=87409 /11.07.05

Chances are, if you have an 11-year-old, he or she can tell you what "fourth street" is -- chances are, they can tell you how many cards there are in the "flop," and how important it is to get the right card "on the river." Earlier this year, opposition education critic Gerry Reid issued a news release suggesting Newfoundland's education department take a hard look at a card game called Texas Hold'em, because the game is infiltrating high school lunchrooms across the province. This year's Grade 6 gambler, after all, probably has better odds of being a future problem gambler.
School kids on the way to 'fourth street'/www.thestar.com/6.18.05

Focus on the Family's Chad Hills says unless there is a crackdown, any home with a computer is a potential casino. And with this internet savvy generation of kids, you can bet it won't be long before they figure out a way to get on there and start gambling as well."
Enforcement of Internet Gambling Laws Gains Steam/
www.family.org/cforum/fnif/news/a0038474.cfm /11.03.05

Steven Oster, staff counselor at UNLV Student Counseling & Psychology Services. The gambling problems he encounters have run the gamut from a forty-something student who ran up $200,000 in debt to a coed who lost $15,000 in a single semester. "For instance, you go to K-Mart, Wal-Mart, wherever, you're going to see Texas Hold 'em this, Texas Hold 'em that. You're going to see marketing to little kids, whether it's cards or chips or video games or apparel."
STRONG GROWTH IN YOUTH PROBLEM GAMBLING/
www.harnesslink.com/www/Article.cgi?ID=30963/11.03.05


PROBLEM gambling among Adelaide teenagers is a serious issue and is up to three times worse than with adults, the South Australian Government says.
MP warns of teen problem gambling/11.03.05
/www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,17126500%255E29277,00.html


Surprisingly, it is on college campuses like Penn University that online poker fever is really taking hold. A recent study across America found that the number of high school and college students playing poker for money has doubled in the last year. A recent study across America found that the number of high school and college students playing poker for money has doubled in the last year.Today more young people gamble once a week than smoke, drink or take drugs combined.
The youthful lure of online poker/ nation.ittefaq.com/artman/publish/article_22341.shtml /10.09.05

The extension of the poker craze into the underage set worries some gambling experts, however. "The more people who play, the more problems there are," said Terry Elman, education coordinator for the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey. "It's gotten to epidemic proportions." "I think it's seen as being exciting," Andersen said of gambling. "There's actually an adrenaline rush that goes along with it. (Teens) like things exciting and risky."
Poker's popularity grows/Home News Tribune Online /10.30.05

Pat Fowler (Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling), who has dealt with the ill effects of gambling addiction for 20 years, said she's never seen anything like the poker phenomenon that is sweeping the nation. She's never been more alarmed, either. Fowler said she believes poker's grip began to take hold when ESPN starting extensively broadcasting The World Series of Poker, a high-stakes tournament set in Las Vegas in which players play Texas Hold'em -- a form of poker in which players are dealt two down cards and can use any of five community cards to form their hand.
When to Hold'em?/www.usforacle.com/9.30.05

CT - Young people in the region are drinking alcohol and gambling more, and an increasing number of teens are carrying weapons and engaging in violent behavior. But they are turning away from tobacco and marijuana. Those are the facts according to the latest survey of area students by the Regional Youth/Adult Substance Abuse Project. (RYASAP's random survey -- of 3,310 students in grades 7 through 12 in the public schools of Bridgeport, Fairfield, Stratford, Trumbull and Monroe) Gambling rose from 29 percent among teens surveyed four years ago to 34 percent this time. "Gambling today is like playing Monopoly to these kids, and we must address that," said Trumbull Board of Education Vice Chairwoman Donna Cassidy.
Gambling rise called troubling Study looks at youth vice/Connecticut Post/10.11.05

The Associated Press reports poker paraphernalia is among this year's Christmas must-haves, and stores from Wal-Mart to Walgreens are making space on shelves for chips and decks. "It seems like the teenagers are in love with it." The UF study found 8 percent of Florida teens 13-17 are at risk of developing a gambling problem. Fowler acknowledges fun poker for pennies has almost always been a part of childhood, "but there was nowhere else to go with it." "And there are parents who don't think there's even a problem," Fowler says. "They're relieved their kids are at home and not out drinking or doing drugs. But it's just as addicting and devastating." Adds Talley: "And when they get in trouble, their families bail them out every time; they're scared of the bookies. So the kids don't even learn about the consequences, get a good lesson from their actions."
Raising the stakes/Ocala Star-Banner, FL/10.13.04

Wexler said a parent recently explained how a student stole $2,500 to gamble with. Wexler knows the story all too well as he started gambling when he was 7 or 8-years old. By 14, he was gambling with a bookie and by 21, he was stealing to support his gambling addiction. "In many cases, drug and alcohol addiction should be secondary to gambling addiction," Wexler said. Gambling addiction contains the same symptoms as other addictions. Pathological gamblers lie, steal, are in large debt, and distance themselves from friends and family, while some become suicidal. School work suffers as gambling becomes the top priority in the person's life. "Students run up debt and the majority of it ends of on credit cards," said Sekany (an instructor in social work at Sac State). He said that students max out on debt, and have no way to solve the problem. "This leads to lying, stealing, and suicide attempts."
College students struggle with gambling addictions /10.05.05 www.statehornet.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2005/10/05/4344737243819?in_archive=

Arnie Wexler, a certified gambling counselor in New Jersey, says more calls for help are coming from parents of teens and teens themselves. "I get calls from parents and kids, some as young as 14, every day," said Arnie Wexler, a counselor and former head of the New Jersey Council on Compulsive Gambling. "This thing has exploded. I've never seen anything explode like this has in the last year." According to a study by the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 15.9 percent of in-state students between the sixth and 12th grades admit to gambling-related woes or signs of addiction. Four percent report they were already stealing money from relatives to gamble.
More teens are betting their lives www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/12571005.htm/9.06.05

Parents should be concerned about the increasing prevalence, access to, and acceptance of gambling in our society. So should the state. Like parents, instead of taking its parental role over all of us seriously, the state seems to take a key role in encouraging and glorifying gambling habits. Instead, shouldn't the state (and the parents) take a more vital role in making sure that kids don't get addicted? Absolutely. Yet the state is one of the biggest promoters and pushers of a very dangerous addiction: gambling.
Editorial:State should take bigger interest in gambling/www.zwire.com/site/ news.cfm?BRD=1714&dept_id=73826&newsid=14580022&PAG=461&rfi=9/5.25.05

"I get calls from parents and kids, some as young as 14, every day," said Arnie Wexler, a counselor and former head of the New Jersey Council on Compulsive Gambling. "This thing has exploded. I've never seen anything explode like this has in the last year." And as schools reopen this fall, the pool of potential underage gamblers is spreading from the upper grades into the middle schools. "Eighty percent of the kids who gamble, there will be no impact on their lives," Looney said. "Fifteen percent will have some problem. And 5 percent will become addicted." The risk of pathological gambling runs about twice as high among adolescents (5 percent) as it does among adults (3 percent), said Dr. Carlos Blanco, head of the gambling clinic at the Columbia University Medical Center. Capretto's facility treats drug and alcohol addiction, although within the past 18 months he noted an increase in younger addicts suffering from gambling woes. On Long Island, there are now two GA meetings devoted exclusively to teens. Kevin, who started attending after his angry parents discovered the depleted tuition fund, is a regular. Of the 48 states with legalized gambling, only 22 devote any government funding to help people with gambling problems, said Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling.
Poker boom attracts younger crowd/Las Vegas Review-Journal/9.04.05

M0 - According to Associate Director of Counseling Services Tom Brounk, his office has seen a large increase in the number of students, particularly males, seeking help for gambling problems. Brounk noted that five years ago, there were practically no students with gambling problems seeking help in his office. While today the number is still a statistical handful, the figure has increased dramatically in the past few years. Eventually the player turns to borrowing and credit to bail himself out of debt. The next step is marked by desperation, remorse, panic and alienation from friends and family. The player starts to blame others and potentially engages in illegal activity. The final phase on the continuum is rife with hopelessness and emotional breakdowns. The player might even face legal consequences for his behavior.
The darker side: Addiction/9.02.05/
www.studlife.com/media/paper337/news/2005/09/02/Sports/Beginning.To.Feel.The.Consequences.
Of.Poker-974889.shtml

Illegal, immensely profitable slot machines hidden away in back rooms at taverns, and children getting hooked on gambling in private card games or on the Internet, are harmful to society, experts said Friday at the second annual Midwest Conference on Problem Gambling and Substance Abuse. "Adolescent pathological gamblers tell us they started at 9 and 10 years old," said Jeffrey L. Derevensky, a professor of psychology and co-director of the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High Risk Behaviors at Montreal's McGill University. By that age (21), Derevensky said, one in 20 of them may have a compulsive gambling disorder that was honed on the Internet or in cell phone games, betting on sports with friends or playing too-easy access to state lottery games. He said his own research in 2004 found that by eighth grade, 15 percent of students used tobacco or alcohol weekly, but 49 percent were regular gamblers. Meanwhile, plenty of adults are also gambling surreptitiously, on illegal slot machines and other devices "hidden in plain view" in bars, private clubs, convenience stores and even Laundromats, said Ernest M. Raub, enforcement manager for the Missouri Gaming Commission.
Conference explores dangers of gambling/the Kansas City Star/8.27.05

In fact, compulsive gambling is more common among teens than adults.
Seeing Red: Chasing Green Costs Students/WQOW, WI/8.26.05

Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors at McGill University in Canada, discovered that 80 percent of U.S. children ages 12 to 17 had gambled within the past year. In serious cases, according to the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, problem gambling could lead to depression, peer-relationship problems, family trouble and a lack of focus in the classroom. For some, the convenience of online gambling - the ability to place bets from home - has led to serious addictions.
It's a Gamble: Teens call betting fun; experts label it risky/www.journalnow.com/8.15.05

Experts fear the obsession is putting America's youth at its highest risk ever for compulsive betting -- and worry that assistance programs are lagging. '"I get calls from parents and kids, some as young as 14, every day,'" said counselor Arnie Wexler, former head of the New Jersey Council on Compulsive Gambling. '"This thing has exploded. I've never seen anything explode like this has in the last year."
Teenage boys going all in for poker craze/www.suntimes.com/9.04.05

What officials already have discovered is sobering. Students even in junior high are gambling, and some are showing signs that could lead to gambling addiction. "It's seen as a socially acceptable past time and recreation, but it can be so damaging financially, emotionally and spiritually," she said.
Proctor Hospital program combats teen gambling/ www.pjstar.com/stories/090405/TRI_B7EDLP40.032.shtml/9.04.05

At Harvey High School, located about 30 kilometres southwest of Fredericton, student gamblers have lost as much as $200 playing cards at lunch. But principal David MacMullin became concerned when he discovered that some kids were carrying around lists of people who owed money from the games.
Poker stakes too high, N.B. principal says
/www.cbc.ca/story/canada/national/2005/05/10/5.10.05


Gamblers Anonymous member Paul K. said parents last month brought a 13-year-old boy who was gambling online to a Braintree support meeting.
Young card sharks bite into poker craze/Boston Herald/5.08.05

Poker is fast becoming a popular pastime among college students and even high school-age youth. Experts say that the earlier a person starts to gamble, the greater the risk of them becoming a compulsive gambler. One survey states that 96 percent of recovering adult male gamblers started gambling before the age of 14.
Card rooms too much of a gamble/www.news-miner.com/By Debbie Joslin, Alaska Eagle Forum President/5.7.05

Therefore, thanks to the the Internet, people under 21 can legally gamble since they are doing so "overseas," right from the comfort of their own homes.
Student wins $120,000 by playing online poker/www.dailyillini.com/5.06.05

Considered a process addiction, experts have found that compulsive gambling can cause the same social, physical and psychological problems that are often associated with alcoholics and drug addicts. According to statistics from the National Council on Problematic Gambling, Inc., the involvement in gambling among adolescents in the United States now exceeds the expected onset for their use of cigarettes, hard liquor and marijuana. "Oftentimes a person's problem can lead them to bankruptcy," she said. "And that can make matters even worse because the person might resort to embezzlement, stealing, selling drugs or prostituting themselves in order to get their hands on some money."
Betting it all/www.idsnews.com/story.php?id=18557/9.30.03

According to the Missouri Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, teens ages 14-17 are three times more likely to participate in gambling than people 25-40. This is why the Port Authority is eager to continue to fund research and awareness programs to educate youths about the dangers of problem gaming.
Youth gambling on the rise/www.kansascity.com/8.24.05

A college student recently confessed that his gambling debt is equal to the amount of his student loans. A high school senior stole drugs from the pharmacy where he worked to support his betting habit. The wild popularity of televised poker and the easy access to Internet gambling, not to mention the presence in southeastern Connecticut of two of the world's largest casinos, are exposing more young people to gambling and potential problems, said experts who spoke to a handful of people Wednesday at a forum at Connecticut College. Ted Nikolla, executive director of the task force (The Citizens' Task Force on Addictions), said that in his experience, eight out of 10 middle and high school students say they have visited the local casinos. He held up fliers for Texas Hold 'Em poker tournaments from local college campuses as proof that gambling fever is spreading rapidly, and spoke of a teen-age boy who will not graduate high school as scheduled this spring because he was arrested for stealing drugs from his job to support his gambling habit. "This is really a major public health concern and it gets very little attention," he said.
Youth Betting Is On The Rise/www.theday.com/4.28.05

For Oscar, and a growing number of students, playing the popular poker game online is swiftly becoming a new American pastime - with potentially dangerous consequences. "This is a new phenomenon. There is no research out there yet on youth and online poker addiction," said Rina Gupta, co-director of a youth gambling research center at McGill University in Montreal. They call and say, 'I am a counselor in a school, there are a lot of kids playing poker. Help!' " The News found kids as young as 11 playing poker online for play money. Therapist Heiko Ganzer, who specializes in gambling addiction, said when he was summoned to a Long Island school by a worried staffer last month, he asked 150 boys how many had ever gambled. To the surprise of the teachers - but not Ganzer - 90% of them raised their hands. Still, Ganzer, a member of the New York Council on Problem Gambling, was taken aback when he wandered into the auditorium and noticed four kids playing online poker on their laptops in the middle of the school day.
Experts say it can be difficult to detect if your child is gambling. Here are some questions to ask adolescents:
1. Is gambling more important than school?
2. Do your friends gamble a lot?
3. Do you try to prevent family or friends from knowing how much and how often you gamble?
4. Do you ever say you won when you lost?
5. When you lose, do you feel you must bet as soon as possible to win back your losses?
New York Daily News/Online and hooked/4-25-05

The first generation to grow up with legalized gambling is creating a rising number of teens with gambling addictions. Almost one in three high school students gamble on a regular basis, according to the National Academy of Sciences. But gambling is addictive. Studies show that problem gamblers exhibit similar functional changes in their brain's decision-making center as drug addicts and alcoholics. Researchers have also found that the more exposure a child has to gambling, the more likely he or she will become a compulsive gambler - as a teen and into adulthood. While 4 percent to 5 percent of adult gamblers will develop a serious gambling problem, underage gamblers are three times as likely as adults to become compulsive gamblers. "Our youth need major help, and someone has to be willing to step up to the plate before they start getting really devastated."
Teen Newshour: A rise in teen gamblingaddicts/www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/ 11545990.htm/5.02.05

All that money is coming from someone's pockets, and it's not the winners'. According to Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling, as many as 10 million U.S. adults meet the "problem gambling" criteria. Kids are hit even harder. What health officials want to know is whether the damage can be curbed. "But gambling is a pure addiction."
When Gambling Becomes Obsessive/www.tim/time/magazine/7.24.05

With TV poker and Internet casinos all the rage, gamblers are getting younger and the stakes are getting higher. He's only 15, after all, well shy of the legal Missouri gambling age of 21. The high school sophomore can admire his favorite professional poker players. Sit on the couch and ogle gigantic stacks of cash. And learn strategies for $5 poker throw-downs with his buddies. But experts caution that gambling’s expansion -- TV poker, casinos and lotteries, Internet casinos, horse and dog tracks, casino-style after-prom parties, publicized sports-betting lines -- makes America's next generation more vulnerable to gambling problems. The earlier someone starts gambling, the more likely he or she will become an adult problem gambler, research shows. Most adult problem gamblers began gambling around 10 or 11, said Jeff Derevensky, who leads the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems in Montreal, Quebec. Teenagers, primarily boys, have long played poker and bet on football and pool games... In New Jersey, people under age 21 made 6 percent of the calls last year to a gambling help line. Johnson County therapist Michael Hanson worked with a teenager who in the past two years has played so much poker that he buried himself in debt, flunked out of college and got kicked out of his house. A sophomore at Washington University in St. Louis boasted last semester in the student newspaper's "featured poker player" of the week column that he often played poker online until 6 or 7 in the morning and slept until 4 p.m., missing classes and even a midterm exam.
Kids and cards: No safe bet/www.kansascity.com/7.24.05

"You can say online gambling is illegal, but if you can't enforce [the law] it doesn't matter," he says. "When you gamble online, transmitting money is easier and you don't know how much you are losing. My concern is that kids are getting into hock on the web and maxing out credit cards." whyte executive director for the National Council on Problem Gambling
The Odds Are Good That Online Gambling Will Continue to Thrive -- But at What Price?/www.informit.com/7.22.05

What he does know, from a 2003 Nebraska Risk and Protective Factor Student survey, is that about 19 percent of students who gamble had their first gambling experience under the age of 10. Five years ago, it was more likely to be at age 14 to 16, he said. "It was comparable to when kids had their first experience with alcohol." Now gambling hits a much younger group.
Gambling for kids may be risky business/Lincoln Star Journal/7.2.05

Young people have been caught up in the U.S. explosion in interest in poker and other forms of gambling. Experts on addictive behavior see potential trouble. But experts caution that gambling's expansion -- TV poker, casinos and lotteries, Internet casinos, horse and dog tracks, casino-style after-prom parties, publicized sports-betting lines -- makes America's next generation more vulnerable to gambling problems. Betting more frequently and with larger amounts of money are important signals. But there are others, too: withdrawing from friends and family, losing interest in other activities, exhibiting signs of depression and performing poorly in school. These signs should prompt parents to get involved and seek a therapist's help, experts say.
Gambling's rise in popularity stirs concerns/www.miami.com/8.02.05

Even teenagers who don't play cards can get hooked on gambling by trying to win games of chance at arcades, playing hand-held game machines or betting on sporting events. An estimated 10 percent of callers to the state's hot line for problem gamblers ask for help in dealing with kids who are becoming compulsive gamblers, said Jim Pappas, executive director of the Council on Compulsive Gambling of Pennsylvania. About 5 percent of kids who gamble risk developing an addiction, said Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling in Washington, D.C. The earlier someone starts gambling, the more likely he or she is to develop a problem, Whyte said.
A losing hand: Gambling's addictive nature can be a risky wager for teens http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/trib/regional/s_324379.html /4.15.05

Does your college student or teen suddenly have a lot of money (or debts) that he can't account for? Gambling may be the culprit. It has always been a potential hazard for teenagers. Gambling addiction is rampant among college-age kids. It's as much as five times more common in this age group than among adults, says Christine Reilly, executive director of the Institute for Research on Pathological Gambling and Related Disorders in the Division on Addictions at Harvard Medical School. Gambling addiction is more likely than any other form of addiction to lead to suicide, says Sharon L. Mitchell, director of the counseling program at the University of Delaware, because the bottoming out is accompanied by such devastating financial loss. Gambling addicts are likely to steal money from family, roommates or friends.
Gambling addiction can ensnare teens/www.delawareonline.com/7.11.05

"I haven't been to a school yet where they haven't been gambling inside the school during the school day," said Anneliese Oti, coordinator of the Problem Gambling Education Program for the Beachwood-based Jewish Family Service Association. Adolescents are the fastest-growing portion of the gambling public, Oti said. Experts note that some adult gambling addicts started when they were young. Louis Weigele, program director of the Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse for the Cleveland Department of Public Health, provides counseling to 16 gambling addicts, 12 of whom started when they were teenagers.
School gambling raises concern/8.01.05
http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/cuyahoga/
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It's become an issue in the high school: dollar hands at lunch and in study hall, even five-dollar quick draws on the tops of textbooks in the corridors in the four-minute breaks between periods. But gambling experts say all this poker is cause for concern. "We see it as a public health issue on par with serious drug abuse," says Keith Whyte, the executive director of the Washington-based National Council on Problem Gambling. Teens who gamble, he says, are more likely to develop gambling addictions as adults -- and more likely to binge-drink, smoke marijuana and have unprotected sex now. The National Council on Problem Gambling's Keith Whyte agrees: The majority of kids who gamble -- poker or otherwise -- aren't going to become addicts.
The game that's got a hold on your kids/The Times Herald-Record/4.10.05

Two 15-year-olds from Bergen County who sought help for gambling addictions just a few weeks ago. Three 19-year-old college students from Hudson, Passaic and Bergen counties whose lives are on hold because of gambling. Two were kicked out of school for gambling, the third was pulled from an Ivy League school by his parents because of it. And the Princeton high school student who maxed out a friend's credit card, racking up $9,000 in debt on Internet gambling. Ed Looney, executive director of the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey, who provided the examples of young people who became trapped by gambling, said that one-fourth of card players who answered an online survey in 2003 were under 18. Last year, nearly half the card players were underage. "There's no question it's because of the effect of 'Texas Hold 'Em' TV shows that have been put on television," Looney said.
TV poker hooking, hurting teenagers/Northjersey.com/4.7.05

IL - There's a new face in the hallways at a Metro East school after a series of discipline problems, including students gambling in the classrooms.
Lincoln Charter School Hires Resource Officer After Discipline Problems Arise/www.ksdk.com/3.29.05

E was a ninth grader when the gambling addiction was born.
Before long, he had fallen into a spiral of borrowing money from friends, wheedling cash from his father and selling marijuana to keep his habit going. Now, just months after quitting, he is speaking at local high schools about a problem that is getting increased attention in Westchester: gambling addictions among adolescents. As school authorities are catching students in the act of gambling on the Internet, or devoting more time to their poker games, two other county high schools have called him in preventively to teach counselors what to do in such incidents. Experts who have completed studies, among them Dr. Jeffrey Derevensky of McGill University in Montreal, a leading researcher in adolescent gambling addictions, estimate that 4 percent to 8 percent of adolescents suffer from a gambling problem, ... Jim Maney, executive director of the New York council, says he believes gambling is on the rise among young people and has probably jumped since the survey was taken. He also says parents don't understand the extent of the problem. But in some of the county's wealthier communities, he said, parents are too willing to cover their children's debts. As he put it, "You bail out, you bail out, you bail out and there's no return." And his (18 year old) family got the worst of it. In just a few years' time, he accumulated a debt of $30,000 with his father and other relatives. "I'm 18 and I owe $30,000," he said. "Some people make that in a year."
Teenage Gambling Craze: More Sinister Than Benign?/New York Times/3.27.05

Professional poker players, fueled by the explosion of tournaments on television, have become celebrities and inspirations to adolescents.
In Southeastern Connecticut, at least four schools have called the local gambling-prevention center in the last year because children were gambling on school grounds. Attorney General Richard Blumenthal said his office had received an increasing number of complaints from parents looking to recover money their children had lost at online gambling sites. They are playing at school, using the cafeteria to get in a few hands, and some are running up serious debts. And in Wallingford, a 15-year-old became so addicted to poker that after he ran out of his own money, he took his parents' credit cards so he could play online, lost $5,000, then broke into a friend's house and stole $3,500. Students were playing cards in the cafeteria, which doubles as a student center, Mr. Freeston said, but after learning of the debt problems, the schools banned card playing. Scott Guay, a gambling counselor who has contracts with multiple schools, has treated 18 to 20 students in the last two years.
In two days, she said, her son and his friends had run up $5,000 in debt on her credit cards, which her son had stolen. Because adolescents can gamble surreptitiously on the Internet, their problems sometimes go untreated until the damage comes out in other ways. "They don't usually come in on their own," Mr. Armentano said. "Maybe they get arrested. Maybe they get in trouble in school and their parents send them." She ( Devendorf, the coordinator of the Better Choice Gambling Treatment Program) said she sees at least as many young people who have problems with sports betting and other forms of gambling. Often they have more than one game they like to play.
As Adolescents Bet, More Are Having Gambling Problems/New YorkTimes/3.27.05

Tom, who has lost more than $100,000 (and is currently down $55,000) since his senior year in high school, has a ritual. He plays alone in the bedroom of his off-campus apartment. The lights are off. The door is locked. He does not eat, does not answer the phone, does not even go to the bathroom. And he loses. "Ridiculous amounts," he says. "I'll gamble $400 a day, play 12 hours a day." "I'm always scared, always depressed and sad. I ruined my life. I messed up my life, my academics, my friendships. Just don't gamble. Don't do it.
All In/sportsillustrated.cnn.com/4.28.05

The American Psychiatric Association reports that 6 percent of teens who have tried gambling became pathological gamblers. Researchers at the International Center for Youth Gambling Problems and High Risk Behaviors at McGill University in Montreal identify increased criminal activity, strained family relationships and depression as consequences of gambling problems among youth. (An estimated 30 percent of pathological gamblers attempt suicide.)
Cyberspace gambling getting to be a dicey situation for young people/San Jose Mercury News/3.26.06

Gambling mania among adolescents is growing so quickly that mental health professionals are struggling to keep pace, a youth gambling expert said Friday at Salve Regina University. the United States is lagging in providing treatment and education about problem gambling among youngsters. "The marketing is brilliant," he said. "It's no longer gambling, which has a negative connotation, it's now called gaming." Addictive gambling may lead to crime, suicide or suicide attempts and a withdrawal from school and social life... adolescents with gambling disorders start at age 9. (Jeffrey Derevensky is a psychology professor who treats adolescents at McGill University in Canada)
Dark side of gambling brought to light in talk at Salve/
www.newportdailynews.com/articles/2005/06/04/news/news2.txt/6.04.05

And the kid whose mother had to ban him from the house because he was stealing things, including her alimony checks, so that he could gamble. "My concern is that the negative consequences of gambling will be with them for the rest of their lives," says Jeff Derevensky, who has been studying kids and gambling since the two started coming together in disturbing numbers.
He has seen what gambling does to kids/www.projo.com/news/bobkerr/projo_20050601_wedco01.24afa85.html/6.01.05

It's a hidden addiction with no overdose, no drugs to ingest, and no drug test to pinpoint it. But make no mistake, compulsive gambling can injure, even destroy families -- especially when the addict is a teenager. However, counselors warn the Texas Hold-em "high" teens get may put them at risk for a lifelong addiction. He said it's a habit that can tear a family apart as they search for answers. "What do I do? I'm bailing them out. I'm in debt. They're in debt. They're in trouble. They are still living with me. They've stolen everything I've got," Harris said. "It gets out of control."
Government to curb gambling arcades/9.14.05
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